If McMansions aren’t your style and your handy with a hammer, why not try building your own “tiny home.”

Beginning in August, Seminole State College (SSC) will show you how during a two-semester, project-based course in which students design a code-compliant, net-zero “smart” tiny house during the fall semester. Students will build the house in the spring.

The challenge of a net-zero dwelling is to have the home produce as much energy as it consumes by incorporating alternative energy sources, such as solar, while minimizing consumption with the use of energy-efficient appliances and fixtures.

“This innovative class provides an opportunity for students from across various programs to collaborate on a single design challenge relevant in today’s industry,” says Cheryl Knodel, associate dean for the Centers for Construction, Architecture and Interior Design. “The hands-on approach will make the connection between the conceptual and the real world while applying learned skill sets.”

The course listings are:

BCN 2930, Section 10166:  Selected Studies in Building Construction: Tiny Home Design Phase

IND 2930, Section 10167:  Selected Studies in Interior Design: Tiny Home Design in CAD  

While there are no prerequisites, students are encouraged to have some background in the areas of design, engineering, sustainability and construction.

The course is made possible, in part, by a $900,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to expand Seminole State’s Construction, Engineering Technology and Sustainable Engineering programs.

For more information, contact the program at 407-708-4500 or apply by clicking (here).

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